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Through the lens of a camera
Photo: Christopher Hunt

Overview

Light hunter

Mia Stålnacke’s journey in photography started in a very dark place but turned out to be the eye opener that she needed to survive.

“I happen to live in a beautiful place with views over mountains, lakes and rivers.”

Mia Stålnacke’s journey in photography started in a very dark place but turned out to be the eye opener that she needed to survive. Having suffered from eating disorders and anxiety from the age of 10, a man at her recovery home approached her and told her something the doctors had not: “Nature is the best medication of all. If you head out to see instead of just looking you will notice the difference,” he advised, and Mia took him for his words. 

“One ice cold winter day when the polar night had just ended, I did just that. I went out to see. It was like being brought back to life again,” Mia recalls. 

“I wandered around and studied everything there was in the forest, and I viewed everything with a new pair of eyes. I instantly went home to bring my old camera and started snapping. It helped me frame details in nature I had never seen before. Since that day I never leave my house without it.” 

Mia’s life completely turned, and she recovered from her depression. “The man was right, it was the world’s best medication,” she says.

Mia Stålnacke with her dogOn the Instagram of Mia Stålnacke @angrytheinch you find wonderful nature photos - with some starring her dog, too.Photo: Christopher Hunt


Despite that the sun doesn’t rise above the horizon at all during the polar nights in her hometown Kiruna located north of the polar circle, Mia has made it her sport to capture what’s only visible in these conditions. Her images which she shares on her Instagram account @angrytheinch, are full of magical green and purple light, snow covered mountains and starlit skies. 

“I happen to live in a beautiful place with views over mountains, lakes and rivers. The polar nights don’t mean we don’t get any light – we have a fantastic blue light phenomena that turns to pink and red for a few hours,” she describes, and adds:

“From the darkness light appears. You are not able to spot the Northern Lights or the stars unless it’s dark. If you go out in the pitch black here, your eyes will slowly adapt, and a completely new world will appear above you.”