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Aia Jüdes with woodmaker John Lindholm
Photo: Aia Jüdes

Things to do

Stockholm, a design city – interview with artist Aia Jüdes

We asked Aia Jüdes, an expert in high end handicraft, subcultures and art, to share her best places to visit in Stockholm.

Multi-talented Aia Jüdes got lots of attention when she used birch bark to create unique objects. She is just as comfortable in the woods of Dalarna, learning skills from the birch bark woodmakers, as she is in the city of Stockholm.

When we asked Aia Jüdes to share her best places to visit in Stockholm she starts off by mentioning a place south of the city center, Design Lab Skärholmen. It’s not a tourist attraction but she stresses its importance for the local community and the future of Swedish design: 

“Design Lab Skärholmen with its creative director Samir Alj Fält has a wonderfully refreshing and playful approach to design, and I especially like how they work with children.”

What to visit?

Naturally, when in Stockholm, the annual Stockholm Design Week is an absolute must when it comes to events. Aia also recommends one of her favourite places to visit, Örnbergsauktionen, an artist operated auction house for studio produced design. She encourages visitors to check out the program and the designers. “Their exhibitions and the galleries are worth a visit on any other day.”

Worth a visit any time of year is Artipelag. “I enjoy the full experience of sustainable design in a broader perspective. Artipelag is a good example of a place where the Swedish archipelago, modern architecture, organic food and enjoyable exhibitions intertwine as a unified event of high quality.”

Another one of Aia’s favorites is the Galleri Sebastian Schildt “You find it on Strandvägen, next door to the classic store Svenskt Tenn. Here you can find jewelry, design, and art-work exhibited by exciting craftsmen and artists.”

As a hidden gem, Aia mentions the library of Svensk Form in Skeppsholmen. “It is a cosy library of design sited in an old school, with an interior by Jonas Bohlin.” Although not open to the public more than once a month, it’s possible to book a visit in advance for reading literature and design magazines. 

Where to eat?

“For an interesting dining experience I would recommend two of my favorite restaurants, Volt in Östermalm and Rutabaga at Grand Hotel, which are both very design conscious. Also sustainability infuses the whole experience, from the décor to the menu.”

And a final question: What is the most exciting thing that is happening in Swedish design right now?

“Well, there is plenty to get excited about when it comes to Swedish glass design! For example, many young designers and artists have taken inspiration from authentic glassblowing traditions, and have experimented with the craft and created new exciting contemporary displays. I would describe it as somewhere between art and functional design.” 

“There is also a new generation of designers that has risen from the ashes of the old closed-down glassworks and who have started their own independent smaller glassworks where glassware is designed and made according to their own new ideas. Åsa Jungnelieus, Frida Fjellman, and Simon Klenell are just a few of the many.“