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Information for travellers in regards to the corona virus (covid-19 pandemic)

Here you will find restrictions and recommendations about travelling to and staying in Sweden. As this kind of information may be due to change quickly, you need to check what applies with relevant authorities before travelling to Sweden.

Travelling restrictions for Sweden

As of 1 July, a Covid certificate is needed for foreign nationals in order to travel to Sweden. The certificate shows that a person has been tested negative, has been vaccinated against, or recovered from Covid-19.

Travellers from the Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Iceland and Norway) do not have to present a Covid certificate.

There is a ban on non-essential travel to Sweden from countries outside the EU/EEA until 31 October. A number of countries are exempt from the entry ban.

For more information about the Covid certificate, travel to Sweden and a list of the countries that are exempt from the entry ban, please visit krisinformation.se: “International travel restrictions” and FAQ page of the Swedish Government.

You can also use Re-open EU, an official website of the European Union, that provides information on the various measures in place, including on quarantine and testing requirements for travellers, the EU Digital Covid certificate to help you exercise your right to free movement, and mobile coronavirus contact tracing and warning apps. The information is updated frequently and available in 24 languages.

Those who enter Sweden from outside the Nordic countries are recommended to take a Covid-19 test on arrival in Sweden. This recommendation is valid until 31 October. Those who have been fully vaccinated for two weeks, children under six years of age and those who have been diagnosed with Covid-19 in the past six months are exempt from the recommendation. Read more at krisinformation.se: “Recommendation to be tested after staying abroad extended".

Recommendations and regulations when in Sweden

In general, businesses in Sweden are open but physical distancing applies and all businesses must take precautions to reduce the risk of spreading Covid-19. For a summary of the rules and recommendations due to the coronavirus, please visit krisinformation.se: "Current rules and recommendations".

During the autumn, the restrictions in Sweden are being phased out in stages. Several restrictions will be removed on 29 September. Read more at krisinformation.se: “How restrictions will be phased out”.

For general information about Covid-19 restrictions and regulations in Sweden, please visit krisinformation.se: “Covid-19 information for tourists”.

Travelling from Sweden

Please keep yourself informed of the different regulations that may apply in different countries for travelling from Sweden.

Please note
This page is based on information from the Swedish authorities. We strive to keep it updated with the latest changes, but as this kind of information may be due to change quickly and may also differ for parts of the country, you need to check what applies by visiting the links of this page as well as the relevant authorities in the country you are travelling from. Please note that Visit Sweden accepts no responsibility for the accuracy of this information.

Archipelago

Stockholm archipelago.

Photo: Henrik Trygg/imagebank.sweden.se

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