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Treehotel in Harads, Lapland
The Mirrorcube at the Treehotel is a box clad in mirrored glass, located in Harads, Luleå, Lapland
Photo credit: Håkan Stenlund

The most unusual places you ever stayed

The Icehotel in Swedish Lapland, with its extravagant rooms made entirely of ice, imaginatively redesigned and rebuilt from scratch every year since 1990, remains the original. But the list of unusual places to stay in Sweden is growing.

Harads, also a Swedish Lapland destination, adds Treehotel and Arctic Bath to the list. Every one of the treehouse rooms at Treehotel is spectacular, from the four square metre ‘Mirrorcube’ encased around a tree trunk to a giant bird’s nest reached by ladder.

The wonderful Arctic Bath hotel features a circular mesh of logs on a platform floating out on the river, with cabins elevated on poles and linked like satellites to the main building via wooden walkways.

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Year-round Icehotel

The Icehotel 365 is an ice hotel open year-round. Just as its winter season counterpart the Icehotel, the year-round version is located in Jukkasjärvi 200 kilometres north of the Arctic Circle, and offers suites, a bar and art exhibitions.

Photo: Asaf Kliger/imagebank.sweden.se

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Year-round Icehotel

Photo: Asaf Kliger/imagebank.sweden.se

Ice church

Photo: Hans-Olof Utsi/imagebank.sweden.se

Building a hotel of ice

Photo: Asaf Kliger/Icehotel/imagebank.sweden.se

The Mirrorcube at the Treehotel in Harads, Swedish Lapland

Photo: Swedish Lapland

Treehotel in Harads

Photo: Tina Axelsson/Visit Sweden

Treehotel in Harads, Lapland

Photo: Håkan Stenlund

Treehotel in Harads, Lapland

Photo: Håkan Stenlund

Arctic Bath in Harads

Photo: Anders Blomqvist/Visit Sweden

Arctic Bath in Harads

Photo: Swedish Lapland

For the more outward bound, Sweden offers ‘glamping’ options such as the luxury lavvu tents at the Aurora Safari Camp on the Råne älv river north of Luleå.

The unusual hotel idea has spread south too. In Västerås, on Lake Mälaren, you can stay in the Utter Inn, a floating hotel with an underwater room or, Hotell Hackspett, another tree hotel. On the opposite end of the spectrum, you could also try out a suite 155 metres below ground level at the Sala Silver Mine.

Close to the capital of Stockholm, you can even stay in a converted Boeing 747 jumbo jet at the Arlanda airport. Jumbo Stay has rooms in the jet casing and cockpit, as well as in other parts of the plane. Another notable option is the Island Lodge glamping in the Stockholm archipelago, where the tents are heated by wooden stoves.

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Hotel Utter Inn

Hotel Utter Inn is a floating hotel with the bedroom three meters below the water surface. It is located just outside Västerås harbor.

Photo: Leon Grimaldi/Visit Västerås

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Hotel Utter Inn

Photo: Leon Grimaldi/Visit Västerås

Hotel Utter Inn

Photo: Pia Nordlander/Visit Västerås

Glamping at Island Lodge, Stockholm

Photo: Anna Hållams

Islanna tree hotell in Falköping

Photo: Islanna

At Dalsland, some two hours north of Gothenburg in West Sweden, the 72 Hour Cabin offers a selection of tiny glass cabins set amid nature. Near Falköping, there’s the Islanna Treehouse Hotel, which offers traditional Swedish-style wooden houses, complete with elaborate wooden embellishments, mounted on poles high up in the trees.

On the south-east coast, on Sweden’s largest island Gotland, Fabriken Furillen offers a stylish, minimalist hotel built in a former limestone crushing plant.

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The 72 Hour Cabin

The 72 Hour Cabin in West Sweden.

Photo: Maja Flink

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The 72 Hour Cabin

Photo: Maja Flink

The 72 Hour Cabin, West Sweden

Photo: Jonas Ingman/Westsweden.com

The 72 Hour Cabin, West Sweden

Photo: Jonas Ingman/Westsweden.com

Hotel room at Fabriken Furillen, Gotland

Photo: Fabriken Furillen Hotel & Restaurant

Hotel

Photo: Tina Axelsson/imagebank.sweden.se

Restaurant

Photo: Tina Axelsson/imagebank.sweden.se

Unique accommodation in Sweden’s nature

Sweden has countless opportunities for tourists to get close to nature in special, often unique settings. From treehouses and hotels made of ice to off-grid cabins and luxury glamping sites, the options to suit every taste and budget are plentiful.

Sweden’s unique accommodation lets you reconnect with nature

Nature is an integral part of the Swedish lifestyle, contributing to physical as well as mental well-being. Across the country, there are unique escapes – from hotels made of ice to houses nestled in tree tops – that let you enjoy much-needed days in the peaceful tranquility of nature.